UT’s “Writers in the Library” Welcomes Nikky Finney, April 4

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National Book Award winner Nikky Finney will give a poetry reading at the University of Tennessee’s Writers in the Library on Monday, April 4, at 7 p.m. in the Lindsay Young Auditorium of the John C. Hodges Library. The reading is free and open to the public.

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Reading Discussion, April 4th

Our next meeting is coming next Monday, April 4th, at 3:30 in the Melrose seminar room. We will be discussing Caroline Levine’s Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (Princeton University Press, 2015) (description below). Please remember to contact Amy Elias for a headcount for this particular meeting, if you haven’t already.

See you there!

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Amy Elias Presents Work in Progress, March 7

The March meeting of CAAS will take place Monday, March 7, at 3:30 in the Melrose Humanities Center Seminar Room. This month, Amy Elias will workshop a talk she is presenting in early April at the University of Pittsburgh, at a one-day symposium  titled “Coevality: Ethical Being in a Time of Total Change,” featuring talks by Amy and by Christian Moraru. The paper is titled “The Temporality of Dialogue” and the description is as follows:

What time does it take to interact meaningfully with another? In what time zone does relation take place? How do the arts address these questions? In this paper I discuss dialogue not only as an activity or aesthetic aim but as a temporal register in relation to coevalness. Responding to Johannes Fabian’s claims in Time and the Other, one of the touchstones of this Pittsburgh event, I examine different art works in which dialogue fails, is withheld, or is silenced as limit cases that contest the primacy of voice to dialogic interaction in a time of materialist theory; attempt to parse the different temporalities that conjoin in the coeval as revealed through these artworks; and, consequently, raise thorny questions about the difference between relationality and dialogue as political and ethical projects. The paper builds from a talk I gave at Rice University in fall of 2014 that examined the ethics of dialogics, particularly in art that depended upon silence.

Also on the agenda for this meeting is selecting a book to read for our next meeting. Books to be considered include:

  • Caroline Levine, Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network. Princeton University Press (January 2015)
  • Villem Flusser, Towards a Philosophy of Photography, Reaktion Books (October 2000)

Hope to see you there!